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Guillaume (FRA), Roberts (USA) victorious in 2019 Challenge Taiwan

Romain Guillaume of France and Lisa Roberts of the United States both put on spectacular performances at the 2019 Challenge Taiwan in the beautiful city of Taitung.  Guillaume finished with a time of 8:30:15, on the strength of his race-best bike split of 4:19:15, which is 8 minutes and 14 seconds faster than anyone else on the field.    Roberts put on a show on the marathon leg, stamping the best run split overall at 3:02:22, and finished with a time of 9:10:38.

Michael Raelert of Germany led the way in the swim with a 47:03 split, a 3 minutes and 30 seconds headstart against Guillaume who timed a 50:33 split.   They were followed by Per Van Vlerken (DEU), Cameron Brown (NZL) 55:13 and Michael Mckernan (ES) 55:17.    Coming out of T1, the Frenchman Guillaume immediately put his head down to outwork everybody on the 180km undulating bike course.    Guillaume’s 4:19:15 bike split was the best of the day.   Off to the run course, Guillaume has a huge cushion of 14 minutes, allowing him to run a 3rd best 3:13:10 marathon, and still have a 7 minutes and 18 seconds margin of victory over Michael Mckernan.   Mckernan had ran the best run split among men at 3:05:45.    Per Van Vlerken completed podium by finishing at 8:41:55.

Roberts finished the swim 3rd among the women’s elite with a 1:08:28 split.    Carolin Lehrieder of Germany was first out of the water at 56:22, and was followed by Julia Grant of New Zealand 59:28.  On the bike course, Lehrieder had the best split among women at 4:50:12 with Roberts keeping pace with a time of 4:51:56.     With almost a 14 minute lead over Roberts, a huge buffer awaits Lehrieder.    The German’s lead though would dissipate over the course of the 42 km leg.    Robert’s scintillating marathon leg of 3:02:22 would be the best of the race, including men, and would win with a safe margin of 2 minutes and 38 seconds.   Lehrieder and Grant completed podium spots finishing in 2nd and 3rd respectively.

See also:  Triathlon Training Explained | Overtraining And Recovery
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